'Life doesn't imitate art, it imitates bad television.' Woody Allen

Panel shows in decline

The Guardian has a useful article on the decline of the TV panel show (considered a sub-genre of the game show for the purposes of the Year 11 exam).

panel-shows

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Posted: December 5, 2016

Internet vs TV

You know this already, but the BBC has some useful statistics to support the idea that young people are increasingly using the internet rather than watching broadcast TV. If YouTube is a version of TV, and Netflix obviously is, then the amount of TV watched is not so severely affected, but the means of accessing content is.

online vs tv

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Posted: January 26, 2016

Netflix and the TV industry’s problem future

The Guardian has a useful article about the role of Netflix – and by extension other subscription streaming services – in disrupting the TV business model.

tv business model problem

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Posted: January 25, 2016

Audience measurement

How do you measure the audience for a TV programme? For a long time, BARB has been the go-to body for impartial viewing figures, but how reliable are such measures in a changing consumption context? People are increasingly not using TVs to watch TV, so more innovative methods are needed to measure the success of programmes (so the makers can get more money from advertisers or prove value for money in the case of the BBC). Second Sync’s Leaderboard might be part of the solution.

leaderboard

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Posted: May 6, 2013

TV without the TV

Netflix have made quite a splash with House of Cards, and now Amazon/LoveFilm are joining in with internet-only broadcast content. Who needs a traditional broadcast route when you can use the internet? It raises an interesting question about the concept of the ‘TV channel’. Is LoveFilm a channel? Or a broadcaster with many channels? What about YouTube? If you’re studying the TV industry you should be pondering these matters carefully.

amazontv

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Posted: April 21, 2013

Rules of the Platinum Age of TV

Wired.com has a great feature on TV and the issues surrounding delivery, the measurement of success, how audiences are secured and lots more. Students studying the TV industry for the A2 media course should be taking careful note. Whilst the examples and statistics are American the ideas and trends are relevant.

wired tv feature

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